Have proper research studies proven Flavay's® safety and effectiveness? And other frequently asked questions... Dr. Jack Masquelier in laboratorium Frequently Asked Questions & Answers About Flavay

What is Flavay®?

How safe is Flavay®?

How does Flavay® affect the liver?

Does Flavay® have any contraindications?

Should I consult with my doctor before taking Flavay®?

Can the active ingredients in Flavay® be obtained in food?

Is Flavay® patented?

Have proper research studies proven Flavay's® effectiveness?

"What is the difference between the terms OPC and polyphenol? In some cases they appear to be synonymous and in others there appears to be a distinction. On some labels it will say OPC, but in the supplement facts, it says grape seed extract (vitis vinifera) 95% polyphenols. I am confused."

Are OPCs (oligomeric proanthocyanidins) the same as "grape seed extract" or "pine bark extract" products?

Is Flavay® the same as "grape seed extract" or "pine bark extract"?

Is Flavay® the same as OPCs (oligomeric proanthocyanidins) in the marketplace?

Do you have additional questions about Flavay®?

Q. What is Flavay®?
A. Flavay® is the original, highly specialized, nutritional complex of pairs and triples of a specific molecule called "flavan-3-ol," isolated from natural extracts, and that has been extensively tested and examined clinically for biological antioxidant protection, collagen strengthening, tissue rebuilding and other health producing outcomes. MORE
  Top
Q. How safe is Flavay®?
A. After 60 years of human use, no adverse effects have been observed. Furthermore, intensive biological, toxicological, pharmacological and analytical research was conducted for the purpose of registration as a medicine in France and other countries in Europe. In one study, daily doses of up to 35,000 mg for six months were determined to cause no adverse effects. MORE
  Top
Q. How does Flavay® affect the liver?
A.

Flavay® helps protect hepatic capillaries (the smallest blood vessels in the liver) from free radical damage and activates liver antioxidant enzyme systems. A study of twenty patients with cirrhosis of the liver showed that a daily intake of 300 mg of Flavay® can help to decrease capillary fragility of the liver.

  Top
Q. Does Flavay® have any contraindications?
A.

No, Flavay® has no known contraindications (conditions under which it should not be used). Flavay® is completely safe and nontoxic. In fact, clinical trials have been conducted in which pregnant women (troubled by varicose veins and other circulatory problems in the legs) safely used Flavay®. MORE

If you are taking anticoagulant medication, you should ask your doctor whether you may also use Flavay® as it will also decrease the reactivity ("stickiness") of blood platelets. MORE

  Top
Q. Should I consult with my doctor before taking Flavay®?
A.

Yes, please consult your doctor before starting any course of supplementation or diet change, particularly if you are currently under medical care. If you have or suspect you may have a health problem, you should consult your doctor.

  Top
Q. Can the active ingredients in Flavay® be obtained in food?
A.

Yes and No.

The active flavan-3-ol molecules in Flavay® can be found especially in the fibrous and woody parts of naturally-ripened, raw fruits and vegetables, and in the skins of seeds, nuts and fruits. Unfortunately, our fruits and vegetables are typically deficient of these active polyphenol molecules due to our modern methods of distributing food—which result in fruits and vegetables that have been harvested while unripe. Another cause for deficiency is cooking, which destroys the active polyphenols. What's more, the skins of seeds, nuts and fruits are the parts of our food that we generally discard or spit out.

Actually, the best "food" source is red wine. The active principles in Flavay® are at the center of the curious phenomenon known as the "French Paradox." Red wine is a carrier of these healthy polyphenols. So, why not just drink red wine to get your daily dose of flavan-3-ol? Alcoholic beverages are not ideal as dietary supplements due to potential abuse, dependency and toxicity as a result of over consumption. And, while alcohol can compromise liver function, Flavay® actually helps protect hepatic capillaries (the smallest blood vessels in the liver) from free radical damage and activates liver antioxidant enzyme systems. The point is that Flavay® provides specific protection to the liver, and red wine does not.

So, while drinking some red wine is a reasonably healthy for most adults, the best way to guarantee a consistent daily intake of flavan-3-ol polyphenols is in its pure, concentrated form—Flavay®.

  Top
Q. Is Flavay® Patented?
A.

More than 60 years after Dr. Masquelier was awarded his first French patent in connection with Flavay®, all his patents have expired and there are many generic variations in the marketplace.

Flavay® is the product—used in the actual experiments—by which Dr. Jack Masquelier established the "Radical Scavenger Effect."

After more than 60 years, all Dr. Masquelier's patents have expired. In 1948 Dr. Jack Masquelier received a French Patent which described a method to extract the active principles in Flavay® from the bark of the pinus Maritima. In 1970 Dr. Masquelier received another French Patent which described an even more efficient extraction method of the active principles from the seeds of the vitis vinifera grapes. In 1987 Dr. Masquelier was awarded a now-expired U.S. patent to describe the "radical scavenger effect."

Now consumers need to know that the marketplace is full of generic imitations, various “extracts” and derivative forms of Dr. Masquelier’s scientifically proven complex. Unfortunately, many have used Dr. Masquelier’s name and research in unauthorized ways to promote a myriad of derivations. In fact, the other "leading brand" pine bark extract, compared to Flavay® below, is an offshoot derived from Dr. Masquelier's authentic work and products. But, independent comparative testing demonstrates that the initial qualifying research conducted on the authentic products may not be automatically transferred to other commercial products. MORE

  Top
Q. Have proper research studies proven Flavay's® effectiveness?
A. Yes, Flavay® is backed by 60 years of research and human use and extensive testing for safety. The original French and European brands were registered in France as over-the-counter medications and it has therefore been consumed in Europe under medical supervision for decades with no reports of adverse side effects. MORE
  Top
Q: "What is the difference between the terms, OPC and polyphenol? In some cases it appears synonymous and in others there appears to be a distinction. On some labels it will say OPC, but in the supplement facts, it says grape seed extract (vitis vinifera) 95% polyphenols. I am confused."
A:

It's confusing because these terms are used inaccurately in the marketplace. "95% polyphenols" is a meaningless expression in a scientific context. However, it does illustrate a problem: In most cases, the following terms are used interchangeably for commercial interests—or by mistake—and their differences have truly lost all scientific meaning in the marketplace:

The following terms are used interchangeably for commercial interests—or by mistake—and their differences have truly lost all scientific meaning in the marketplace:

bioflavonoids and flavonoids, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPCs or PCOs), and polyphenols.

Therefore, when reading product labels, magazine articles and many popular books, these scientific terms should be considered as generic words and not scientific whatsoever. MORE
  Top
Q. Are OPCs (oligomeric proanthocyanidins) the same as "grape seed extract" or "pine bark extract" products?
A.

Yes (in the marketplace) and No (in the scientific context).

Because of commercial interests—or by mistake— the terms, OPCs and proanthocyanidins, have truly lost all of their scientific meaning in the marketplace. In most cases, suppliers and retailers confuse grape seed extracts as being synonymous with opcs or proanthocyanidins. MORE

However, the terms are not the same in the scientific context. "Grape seed extract" is a nonscientific term that has no specific meaning—other than crushed seeds which can be toxic and oxidizing if not properly manufactured. However, OPCs (short for oligomeric proanthocyanidins) is the active ingredient that was discovered by Dr. Masquelier and proven to have powerful antioxidant properties and other health producing benefits.

It's important to note that independent testing found no active OPCs in a leading American brand of grape seed extract—even though it's aggressively marketed as a branded OPC product. MORE

  Top
Q. Is Flavay® the same as "grape seed extract" or "pine bark extract"?
A.

No.

"Grape seed extract" is a vague, nonspecific term that really has no scientific value. In fact, crude "grape seed extract" (and "pine bark extract") imitations are virtually worthless to the consumer without active and naturally-derived oligomeric proanthocyanidins with antioxidant capacity. Some of these extract products contain nothing more than grape seeds or other plant parts which have been pulverized in a food processor. MORE

Dr. Masquelier's original and only industrial manufacturing plant, located in Gardonne, France.

Flavay®, on the other hand, is a very specific molecular complex which is scientifically defined and manufactured according to the original process developed by Dr. Jack Masquelier in France, approved as an over-the-counter medicine in France and manufactured under the control of French Pharmaceutical inspection.

Independent laboratory testing demonstrates that Flavay® scores the highest as an antioxidant and as a free radical scavenger, which is precisely the free radical scavenging effect that Dr. Masquelier established and documented. MORE

  Top
Q. Is Flavay® the same as OPCs (oligomeric proanthocyanidins) in the marketplace?
A.

No.

OPCs (short for oligomeric proanthocyanidins) is a term that covers many different and complex molecules. However, due to commercial interests—or by mistake—the terms "OPCs" and "proanthocyanidins" are often abused and misunderstood and have therefore lost all of their scientific meaning in the marketplace. MORE

Independent testing found no active OPCs in a leading American brand of "grape seed extract"—even though it's aggressively marketed and branded as an OPC product.
MORE

It's true that "OPCs" is the group of active principles that is responsible for bringing the "grape seed extract" category of products to fame. However, independent testing found no active OPCs in a leading American brand of grape seed extract, even though it's labeled and aggressively marketed as a branded OPC product. MORE

Consumers should also be aware that some manufacturers of grape seed and pine bark extracts have devised ways to artificially boost the proanthocyanidin numbers for their extracts in a test tube (in vitro, which is outside the living body and in an artificial environment ). However, there is no scientific research to show whether the human body benefits from this artificial boost.

Flavay® is unique. Flavay® is derived from the original manufacturing process developed by Dr. Jack Masquelier in France, which captures the naturally-derived oligomeric proanthocyanidins from their plant sources. For well over 60 years, each batch has been routinely and extensively tested and analyzed to guarantee consistency, potency and purity.

Independent laboratory testing demonstrated that Flavay® scores the highest as an antioxidant and as a free radical scavenger, which is precisely the free radical scavenging effect that Dr. Masquelier established and documented. MORE

  Top
Q. Do you have additional questions about Flavay®?
A.

Click here to submit a question or call 1-800-200-1203.

CLICK HERE TO SEE WHAT FLAVAY® CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

Buy Flavay Now

FLAVAY
for a healthy mind & body

Healthy Source
1-800-200-1203 • (210) 481-0067 • Email
Copyright © 1995-2013 Healthy Source, LLC. All rights reserved.

* Statements made herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
NOTE: We do not compensate for our endorsements and testimonials. We do not consider paid testimonials to be nearly as valuable as comments from customers who were not compensated and yet liked the products so much they gave their testimonials anyway.
REFERENCES: Top
Masquelier, J. A lifetime devoted to OPC and [pyc]. Alfa Omega Editrice, Pub., 1996. Schwitters, B., Masquelier, J. OPC in practice. Alfa Omega Editrice, Publishers, 1995. Kilham, C., Masquelier, J. OPC: The miracle antioxidant. Keats Publishing, Inc., 1997. The International Nutrition Company Special Report, "Pine vs. Pine Comparative Analysis between Masquelier's Original Pine Bark OPCs and another leading brand pine bark extract," Oc. 1998. PhytoChem Technologies, Inc., Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Ju. 1998. The International Nutrition Company Special Report,"Masquelier's Original OPCs and ten grape seed extracts; an independent, reproducible state-of-the-art comparative analysis," No. 1997. Facino RM, et al. Free radical scavenging action and anti-enzyme activities of procyanidines from Vitis vinifera. A mechanism for their capillary protective action. Arzneimittelforschung, 44: 592-601, 1994. Havsteen, B. Flavonoids, a class of natural products of high pharmacological potency. Biochem Pharmacol, 32:1141-48, 1983. Masquelier, J., et al. “Flavonoids et [pyc]” Int J Vit Nut Res, (49)3:307-311, 1979. Yu, C. L. et al. Mutagenicity of proanthocyanidins. Food Chem. Toxicol. 25(2):135-9, 1987. Pantaleoni, G.C., Quaglino, D. Univerisity of Aquila Pharmacol-Toxicologica Report, 1971. Laparra, J., et al., Acta Therapeutica, 4:233, 1978. Volkner, Wolfgang Muller, Ewald, Micronucleus assay in bone marrow cells of the mouse with [pyc]. Cytotest Cell Research GmbH & Co., projects 143010 & 143021; Feb. 1989. Acute and chronic toxicity tests. International Bio-Research, Inc., Hanover, Germany, 1967-1971. Dumon, M., Michaud, J., Masquelier, J. Proanthocyanidin content in vegetable extracts to be used in the preparation of medicines. Bull. Soc. Pharm. Bordeaux, 129:51-65, 1990.
Top
Contact Us | BUY NOW